Private Hernia Ultrasound

All Fees inclusive

Lines Open
Mon – Fri | 8 AM – 7 PM
Sat | 8 AM – 4 PM
Sun | Closed

Performed by Specialist Doctors
registered and regulated by:

What’s Included with my Hernia Ultrasound?

An abdominal wall hernia is when an organ or body tissue squeezes through a weak spot in the wall of the abdomen, often causing a lump which you can feel and may come and go.

Hernias can occur in a number of different places throughout the abdomen, particularly if you have had previous surgery (an incisional hernia).

Groin hernias are up to 10 times more common in men, and this is when the internal body fat or part of the bowel can pass through a weak spot into the inguinal canal – a pathways for structures pass from the abdomen to the genitalia.

The most common types of hernia are:

  • Inguinal (inner groin)
  • Incisional (at the site of previous surgery)
  • Femoral (outer groin)
  • Umbilical (belly button)

Hernias can occasionally cause pain or discomfort and often the lump you feel comes and goes, particularly when you strain or cough but can also get stuck – known as an incarcerated hernia – where tissues get trapped in the outpouching and are at risk of dying.

Most people are able to live with hernias without any problems. However, hernias can become larger and cause a medical emergency if tissue becomes trapped in the outpouching, which causes it to lose its blood supply and dies.

This needs immediate medical attention and can require emergency surgery to free the hernia and ensure there is no lasting damage to the trapped organs or tissues.

Ultrasound scans are a routine procedure often requested by doctors to firstly identify a hernia in the region of interest and secondly, identify the contents protruding through the hernia. 

As hernias penetrate into the superficial abdomen, ultrasound imaging is an ideal method to take detailed images and accurate measurements of the size of the hernia.

There is also the added benefit of being able to perform a dynamic ultrasound examination, ensuring that we can  assess the contents of a hernia and look for motion of the protrusion by asking you to either move or to take a deep breath and hold it. 

All this involves is an ultrasound scan of your tummy area, like a scan a pregnant woman receives at the site of the lump you have been feeling.

It is important you specify the single area where you are feeling the lump to ensure the best possibility to identify a hernia. 

After the doctor or specialist gives you a chance to ask any questions you have, you simply lift up your top to expose your stomach.

The specialist applies a clear gel onto your skin and moves a handheld scanner over the area. Images from the scanner are projected on a screen, and, from here, the specialist can see the hernia, identify the contents and measure the size of a hernia if present. 

If there’s a small hernia, this is unlikely to be causing much symptoms but you can be reassured that there is nothing to worry about. If the hernia is larger or contains important organs like the intestines, you will be advised to see a medical professional to see if surgery is an option that may be of benefit. 

No significant preparation is required for this test. 

Hernia Ultrasound

Your Ultrasound Checks For:

Testimonials

5/5

Private Hernia Ultrasound

99 Harley Street, London W1G 6AQ

What’s Included with my Hernia Ultrasound?

All Fees inclusive

Lines Open
Mon – Fri | 8 AM – 7 PM
Sat | 8 AM – 4 PM
Sun | Closed

Performed by Specialist Doctors
registered and regulated by:

An abdominal wall hernia is when an organ or body tissue squeezes through a weak spot in the wall of the abdomen, often causing a lump which you can feel and may come and go.

Hernias can occur in a number of different places throughout the abdomen, particularly if you have had previous surgery (an incisional hernia).

Groin hernias are up to 10 times more common in men, and this is when the internal body fat or part of the bowel can pass through a weak spot into the inguinal canal – a pathways for structures pass from the abdomen to the genitalia.

The most common types of hernia are:

  • Inguinal (inner groin)
  • Incisional (at the site of previous surgery)
  • Femoral (outer groin)
  • Umbilical (belly button)

Hernias can occasionally cause pain or discomfort and often the lump you feel comes and goes, particularly when you strain or cough but can also get stuck – known as an incarcerated hernia – where tissues get trapped in the outpouching and are at risk of dying.

Most people are able to live with hernias without any problems. However, hernias can become larger and cause a medical emergency if tissue becomes trapped in the outpouching, which causes it to lose its blood supply and dies.

This needs immediate medical attention and can require emergency surgery to free the hernia and ensure there is no lasting damage to the trapped organs or tissues.

Ultrasound scans are a routine procedure often requested by doctors to firstly identify a hernia in the region of interest and secondly, identify the contents protruding through the hernia. 

As hernias penetrate into the superficial abdomen, ultrasound imaging is an ideal method to take detailed images and accurate measurements of the size of the hernia.

There is also the added benefit of being able to perform a dynamic ultrasound examination, ensuring that we can  assess the contents of a hernia and look for motion of the protrusion by asking you to either move or to take a deep breath and hold it. 

All this involves is an ultrasound scan of your tummy area, like a scan a pregnant woman receives at the site of the lump you have been feeling.

It is important you specify the single area where you are feeling the lump to ensure the best possibility to identify a hernia. 

After the doctor or specialist gives you a chance to ask any questions you have, you simply lift up your top to expose your stomach.

The specialist applies a clear gel onto your skin and moves a handheld scanner over the area. Images from the scanner are projected on a screen, and, from here, the specialist can see the hernia, identify the contents and measure the size of a hernia if present. 

If there’s a small hernia, this is unlikely to be causing much symptoms but you can be reassured that there is nothing to worry about. If the hernia is larger or contains important organs like the intestines, you will be advised to see a medical professional to see if surgery is an option that may be of benefit. 

No significant preparation is required for this test. 

Hernia Ultrasound

Your Ultrasound Checks For:

Testimonials

5/5